Organic soil growers mosh pit collective of peeps

If any of you are looking for a soil meter I just got this one in yesterday and have put it through its paces and so far am happy with it. Can do both direct soil PH and liquid PH measurements.
I needed something more accurate than my old analog soil meters as they as all meters do fail over time.
It’s great that I can now calibrate a soil meter and not have to wait 5 minutes for a reading. The only drawback with this meter I’ve found so far is that it isn’t that long so getting down lower in the pot farther than about 5” won’t happen. My old meters went down up to 12”.
I primarily use a meter to check my PH of the soil mix before planting in it making sure it’s in the range. It also gives you the temperature of the soil at that depth.



Below is another I found after I order the one above and apparently it has an app for data logging to your phone to better keep track of individual pots and their PH and temp histories. And they offer option to order with an extra probe if original one goes bad. Mine doesn’t so if I need to replace it I’ll probably try this one next.

Anyway just thought I’d share as I had been looking at the big names in meters but Blue lab was triple the price and they don’t have replacement probes you just throw away the meter.

Enjoy the day

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If i were growing outdoors i would be doing the same thing… maybe once my state gets its head out of it a$$, i will be growing outdoors also…

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@Skydiver @ChittyChittyBangin I’ve been using RO water for my last couple of grows, my water is hard and about 250ppm mostly calcium carbonate based on municipal water report. How do you think that would work in an organic soils or should I stick with the RO? Thanks :sunglasses:

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I was just having this conversation last month here on a different thread somewhere in here and if i remember correctly Calcium carbonate is not good. It has a tenacity for rasing the pH because it accumulates in the soil. Avoid using pH up products as this adds to the mess… go easy on the Silica too…
I use Tap water for all my plants but my ppm is 150-180, in the safe zone but i still had high pH at the end…

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Well with RO water you are starting with a blank slate so you can better control inputs without those additional things.
RO by itself doesn’t require any PH adjustments so when just watering its easier.
That being said there are those who use dechlorinated tap water but if heavy in calcium can raise PH over time. If you’re using peat based soil as it breaks down over time it can acidify later in the grow.
If my soil PH is low I’ll use my tap but if it’s in range I’ll use RO
My tap is around 8.2 and 250 ppm and my soil ph has to be under 6.3 or so but don’t use it often.
There is only so much buffer in soil mixes.
If you can use RO I would
Subject to change without notice as I’m always learning as I go

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This ^^^ sorry late to the party…

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Thanks, at least I won’t have to water to runoff so I’ll save a little on water :sunglasses:

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This is a good point. My pH tanked up to 7.5 towards the end around mid flower. I could’ve been watering to too much runoff and rinsed the buffering out of the pots? I am still trying to understand why my pH did this so that i can avoid for my next run…

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I don’t think buffer can be rinsed out as it’s literally the “life” of the soil that’s the “buffer”

Now could it be drowned or dried out very possible.

My understanding of organics is to keep the soil happy that will in turn keep the plants happy.

I’ve never done organics. I’m planing to do living soil so I’ve done a bit of reading and I think ph isn’t something we are majorly concerned with in organics. Obviously we can’t intentionally add something that’s a 1 or a 14 on the ph scale and expect it to be ok. And seems most tap water is around 6-8ph. Which isn’t even harmful to a well groomed soil!

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